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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, props to @cjclutch for the idea

first off, you need to acquire a few parts, a couple of feet of 5/8 hose
couple of feet of 3/8 hose
3/8 x 3/8 x 3/8 Tee fitting
5/8 x 5/8 x 5/8 Tee fitting
5/8 x 3x8 reducer
the above parts I purchased at a local auto supply store (advanceautoparts.com)
You will also need two check valves
I used https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07456L6BG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

when you have everything you need, it is hooked up as shown in the pics below, since B15U is being a bitch, the pics will follow the post
It really is not hard to do, I cut two pieces of 5/8 hose to hook the check valves to the 5/8 Tee
Once the initial piece was complete, I used my catch can location, which is on the drivers side, to measure hose from catch can, to Tee, to turbo inlet
I also used a 2" piece for the intake check valve to the reducer
then cut the brake booster line and placed a Tee in it, ran the final hose, and things are great!

Under engine vacuum, the block will also be under vacuum. under boost, any blowby will be redirected to the turbo inlet

in the pictures, the check valve, flow is always towards the spring

the line drawing lays it out pretty well, I think!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
using this system, under idle conditions, the engine will be under vacuum, under boost conditions, the check valves will switch and the turbo inlet will be the vacuum source. I verified this by removing the dipstick under idle and listening to the vacuum hiss, and the valve cover oil fill cap as well, same results, hiss!!!
under boost I noticed no changes whatsoever, either in AFR or boost PSI

advantage, this is an active pcv system, as opposed to an atmosphere vented, or turbo inlet vented system, it will keep more moisture out of your oil than either, and with the heated catch can from the group buy, should keep everything much cleaner!

I know before I did this, if on a cold start, I made a beer run, I could find moisture on the valve cover fill cap, with this system, zero!!
 

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Great. Too bad I have to wait till Im driving with boost to use it.
 

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already bought mine. great info
 

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Discussion Starter #7
After my little jaunt yesterday, when I got the pcv system hooked up, I started thinking that it may cause more oil to be sucked into the catch can, so I drained it tonight. its been two weeks since I drained it, after all.
imagine my surprise when I did not have a drop drained from the catch can!!!

for justification, when I had the mishimoto can, after a week it would be full of white fluff, and nastyness. Now, I am even more inclined to pipe the catch can drain back into the block, simply for the zero maintenance factor on it. all the oil I have ever gotten out of it has been relatively clean, so why not? Time to message 2J for a modified dipstick tube!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you
Great info

not sure what the vacuum block is for in this setup
20180112_101119 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr
thats just a typical vacuum manifold, mine is a bit different, but works the same. I cut the brake booster vacuum line to hook up my setup, its the line that goes from the manifold to the short hard pipe on the firewall, and then to the brake booster. I really do think this setup makes a lot of sense, since it is an active vacuum source on the block rather than relying on blowby for circulation. When I seen Calebs drawings, my first thought was "WTF??? Thats what I have been looking for!!!"
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok, 60 miles today, and very nervous about catch can product, first long run with the new pcv system, so, I was worried about extra oil mist being sucked into the catch can, under active vacuum. opened drain when I got home from work (hot mo fo!!!) with a tray underneath, let it drain for an hour and a half, zero product from the can, not a drop!!! next task is to pull the turbo inlet and see how much oil is in there, if any. (for full disclosure, the sleeved block may be the biggest reason for zero product). So my worries were allayed a bit today, I dont have to worry about all my oil getting sucked into the catch can (honestly, this was worst case scenario in my mind). hit 13 lbs of boost and no ill effects seen, in afr, or performance... thinking this may be a good thing!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Small update,

Let the catch can drain overnight with the oil fill cap loose, so no vacuum would be created, got about 3 drops of clean oil out, not bad for a boosted engine!

also, after two days of driving, my turbo inlet...
20180704_100851.jpg

I wiped the oil out of it last weekend, to see how much oil mist I would get into the intake stream with this setup.
as anyone boosted knows, oil from blow by and the catch can in the turbo inlet is a common thing, and not really any kind of issue unless its extreme, the following picture is NOT mine, so no comments on it not being a sentra, but it does show what I was getting every time I checked.
389250226.jpg

It would seem, that in addition to providing active scavenging on the block, it is also reducing oil in the turbo inlet as well.

Seems to be many advantages to this system so far!!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I should also add to this, with this system, you need to be more conscious of the catch can drain, if left open, it will be a raw vacuum leak to the engine intake, the same as unplugging your pcv valve hose while the engine is running. I am sure people that are aware enough of how the engine is running, to run boosted, any deviation in idle or afr would be enough to make you check things out. Another possibility, is under boost, the check valve or associated tubing to the intake manifold could blow apart, resulting in this same vacuum leak setup, but I assume it would be the same as when a coupler blows off, the resulting pop and decrease in performance would mimic a major boost leak. I plan to add clamps on all of the lines from the check valve to the intake manifold just for peace of mind
 

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I assume instead of the vac block > Brake Booster the 2J manifold Vac block would still be adequate?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I assume instead of the vac block > Brake Booster the 2J manifold Vac block would still be adequate?
I have not hooked up my treadstone manifold yet, and still use the 2J vacuum block, will probably work on that this weekend tho. There is nothing wrong with the 2J block setup, other than its in the way when you change the valve cover, and it just looks cleaner with a vacuum block on the firewall.

Feel free to keep using the 2J block!!!

Right now, I cut the line from the manifold to the brake booster and tee'd into it, I guess I should do some better pics of the full installation
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ok, had a hiccup today... drove 70 miles to have lunch with @yogi b. the end of the drive was bumper to bumper stop and go traffic in Helen, Ga. lots of river floaters going all over the place, cars everydamnwhere. took an hour to go 5 miles... those 5 miles, of basically idling and the engine at vacuum filled my catch can and the car started to smoke. I ended up plugging the vacuum line to the intake manifold and isolating the catch can as it was before the check valves. IF I had installed the drainback to the crankcase this would not have happened. Think about that when (if) you do this setup. all of my other drives have been interstate and clear roads, so no extended periods of high vacuum on the crankcase. What I drained out of the catch can would be the amount to fill the chamber to the point that it would be sucked into the intake system. met up with Yogi, had lunch, drove to the parts store to get a drain pan to drain the catch can and keep the oil off of the nice business owners pavement. When I started the car back up it was one hell of a smoke generator for a little while!!!
I strongly recommend draining the can back to the crankcase, so you do not have this issue.
 
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