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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Since these cars are getting long in the tooth, and most owners are hesitant to spend what Nissan wants for a new fuel canister assembly, I did some research and talked to a few people. I found out that the basic canister was available from third party suppliers, that were much cheaper than the actual Nissan canister.

While the canister/filter assembly can be had for under $100, I dont think I would trust my turbo build to a no name fuel pump in a cheap canister, or any build actually. What I came up with, was a cheapish canister I ordered from amazon. I disassembled the canister like you would the OEM version, and replaced the no name pump with my 2J unit, then reassembled.
Topscope brand, $43.99
topscope.jpg

This worked for a while, and I would consider it a successful test of cheap canisters, where the most important part, the new fuel filter, is very workable and on a stock build with a stock fuel pump, may last the remainder of the cars life and solve some issues with fuel pressure.

However, I did this in March, 2018, and in May, 2018, as I was in cruise control on the interstate, it started stumbling, quick glances at all the gauges showed it running very lean AFR's. I pulled over and checked all the easy stuff, and could find nothing, so I limped it home at about 45 mph tops, easy on the gas, and careful to stay out of boost.

I checked the plugs, and borescoped the pistons and could find no evidence of detonation, and nothing wrong as well... Finally decided to pull the fuel pump and check it out (2J pump).

What I found, was the o'ring that goes on the pressure side of the regulator, had pushed out of the housing. several attempts at repairs were unsuccessful until I put a spacer UNDER the top o-ring on the regulator to get me by until a new canister came in.

After much research, I settled on an Airtex unit that had the regulator captured to the filter housing with a metal cage, so that it could NOT push the o-ring out. ($98)I also found a cheaper fuel canister o-ring for those that are on a very tight budget, ten bucks compared to Nissans 15 dollar one.

Filter Canister:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001C6UD12/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

O-Rings:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01IW5RRPU/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BFE5LTA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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I have also attached some pictures of the OEM canister when I removed it to show just how dirty the fuel filter was.
20180308_102618_resized.jpg 20180308_104602_resized.jpg
 

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When I get a chance I actually took a ton of pics when I transferred my walbro pump onto a bosch unit. @shanover, by any chance you could take a measurement of the diameter of the oring? I also found and cross referenced an oring meant for the b14. The oring itself is the same as the b15’s according to the FAST is the same. It is about 11 bucks from rockauto though. Still cheaper than the nissan one by a few.


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Discussion Starter #8
When I get a chance I actually took a ton of pics when I transferred my walbro pump onto a bosch unit. @shanover, by any chance you could take a measurement of the diameter of the oring? I also found and cross referenced an oring meant for the b14. The oring itself is the same as the b15’s according to the FAST is the same. It is about 11 bucks from rockauto though. Still cheaper than the nissan one by a few.


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I cannot check the groove, I suppose I should have when the fuel pump was out, did not think of it. the thickness of the o-ring is 4.5mm, and the diameter appears to be roughly (measuring the o-ring on my desk, not 100% accurate) 130mm OD
 

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Im going to assume it has a built in check valve as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The drain back check valve? I thought those were built into the canister. I just know the walbro pumps a lot more that it fills up the line faster than a stock pump hence no issue with the starting.
I no longer have a stock pump, but IIRC the 2J pump was listed as having a check valve in it, and looking through the outlet, it appears that it does. on the stock canister, there is a pressure regulator, but I found no check valves, nor are there any on either of the aftermarket canisters I have inspected. I will try to remember to check my other 2J pump and maybe get pictures this afternoon when I get home from work. I also have the pumps that came with the two canisters, I will check them as well
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Should also note, if it matters, the reason for the hard starting was fuel draining back through the fuel pump into the tank, as there is no place else for it to go, and there is no check valve in the stock system. Heat and evaporation (possibly boiling, due to engine temps) of the fuel in the rail and lines would create "pockets" that would react the same as air in the fuel lines. In a stock(ish) system, with a check valve in the pump itself, the worst that could happen, is the fuel in the line heats up, and excess pressure bleeds off thru the regulator. Since everyone knows that if a system is pressurized, it also raises the boiling point of liquids, that it effectively eliminates the problem of the infamous Sentra hard start.

Those are my guesses on what caused it, why installing a check valve in the system near the fuel rail, worked to eliminate it, and moving a check valve to the pump outlet does the same thing.
 

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Thats interesting I didnt know 2j pumps came with a built in check valve. Ill have to check my no name one. Ive only ever seen them external in the canister or in line. I would prefer the check valve to be as close to the pump as possible myself. Im guessing they dont offer a quick connect under hood because it would be too complicated to fit anywhere without modding. Also the fact that fuel could still drain back into the tank before the valve if the valve is further away. It should keep pressure, not hold vacuum. I come across the hard start probly 20% of the time and I hate it.

Come to think of it I dont remember seeing on any updated Nissan canister so Im guessing that is also build into the pump.. for $270...
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I can confirm the check valve is in the pump, I did this in two ways, the ol 'wrap your lips around it and suck and blow', and, being the well adjusted individual I am, I tore the outlet apart on one of the cheap units to see how it was put together... I used the ol BFFI method of doing this, broke the outlet tube off and ripped it apart!!

side note, it appears that all of these pumps have check valves, even the cheap ones. must have been an 'improvement' that was recommended across the board.

20180524_163342.jpg

20180524_163208.jpg

so yeah, I tore up a brand new stock fuel pump, just to verify the check valve...
told you I was a well adjusted individual...
 

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to review,
seems we can produce a relatively, inexpensive, maintainable , reliable, adequate, fuel system
for up to 360hp and 16-18lb boost [proven]

more frequently changeable fuel canisters
due to lower price
allows more frequent filter changes and an updated regulator

we have "slip in" with no mods, upgraded, higher volume capacity, pumps with check valves

and now the possibility of a high G fuel pick up


yielding a no return system
far better than the original

imo


Thanks again for raising the subject
 
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