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I am going to post this here, so that more people can read, and see, and maybe understand why I am not a fan of this material.

I used to be big in bowhunting, and target archery, back in the day. I have shot a bow in various forms since I was 6 years old. and tho I am out of practice now, I really did become quite proficient at it.

I had used wood, aluminum and fiberglass arrows for most of my life, and had progressed to the point, in the early 90's, that I shot a 90 pound draw weight compound bow.

Once I had progressed to that point, and what my skill level was, arrows never seemed to last more than 3 shots.

Anyone that knows about archery, knows that arrows must be 'spined' to the draw weight of the bow. This means that an arrows stiffness, or resistance to bending, has to match what the force of the bow string puts on it. If an arrow is too flexible, it will break on the shot, if it is too stiff, you will never have any accuracy, as the arrow actually bends around the bow handle on the release of the arrow.

Carbon fiber arrows came out at about this time, very expensive, and highly touted as the solution to every archers need.

if anyone has ever constructed their own arrows, you know the process of gluing the fletching (feathers), nock, and tip insert into the arrow.

This was done with carbon fiber as well, but almost immediately, there were problems found with this system, one of which, was our normal fletching glue, would not stick to it, nor would knocks or inserts, and hot melt glue seriously weakened the carbon fiber if it was used., resulting in incidences like this:
t6fzwOQ.jpg

and this:
arrow1a.jpg

one affects accuracy, the other ruins your expensive arrow.

developments were made to mitigate this, one of which was a slip on nock and point system, rather than an insert, which stopped the fraying of the end of the arrow when it struck something solid.

another development was the use of epoxy, instead of hot melt glue, or normal arrow fletching glue, as one would damage the shaft, and the other would not stick

When the splintering effect of carbon fiber was discovered, they recommended that you cut a significant portion of the meat around an arrow and throw it away, due to the possibility of splinters in the flesh of the deer.

I spent many hours shooting these arrows, and yes, they are very strong, but they are also very fragile, an issue that a friend of mine found out in the worst way possible one day, he had bounced an arrow off of a tree, and did NOT check it for cracks afterwards.

CF in arrows is NOT like the CF for hoods and body panels, it is all aligned in one direction, lengthwise on the arrow shaft, rather than spiraled, or woven. This is for strength and stiffness, so the arrow can withstand multiple shots from heavy bows.

These are not my friends pictures, but they are basically the same as the injury that he suffered when he shot a cracked carbon fiber arrow from a 70 pound bow.

HGDs7LR.jpg

00small10418382.JPG

from that day forward, I never shot another carbon fiber arrow, or really cared for the claims of strength, lightweight, and stiffness that people put forth. its all bs, CF is more fragile than people realize, and more of a pain to care for in the long run.

yes, its stronger than the same weight of virtually any other material, but to get a steel hood to weigh what cf does, it would basically have to be tinfoil. thats the catch, it really is not stronger, but it IS stronger, weight for weight.

I know people do not understand why I am anti carbon fiber, maybe this will help people to understand. it is not a magic material, it is not a superior material, and IMHO it is not an appealing material visually.

These images are from google image search, we didnt have cell phones back then, and damn sure wouldnt have stopped to take a picture before I carried my friend to the doctor.
 

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This is a bit different situation when talking cf but Ill keep it short. And thanks for the pics lol. I think there are lots of uses for cf but also alot of fails to go along with it. I think the best use of cf are things like bullet proof vests, or maybe used as insulation or wall reinforcement. Just ideas here. But as a pure untampered woven fiber somewhat like Kevlar. I think laminating or applying resin to cf makes it 1000% more vulnerable to break if its stressed the wrong way or being pushed beyond flex limits. Its a game of pros and cons.

As for the automotive industry, It has great use but imo only in extreme situations does it truly shine. An example is that Formula 1 cars are mostly cf, including the chassis. If engineered correctly it has proven to be super strong, flexible, and extremely light weight. Its how you can go so dam fast. On a production car I dont see any of this being beneficial as far as being strong/light weight. Even if you do all body panels and interior, its mostly to prove that you just could. Or perhaps wanna be jdm tyte. Its mostly show to me when I remember all cf NSX's and RX-7's on the cover of Super Street from back in the day. Looked bad fuckin ass as a street car if you ask me. But its only a show car trophy chaser to me that someone else has.

As Ive said before, the only reason why I like cf hoods is 100% cosmetic. Its weight advantage serves no purpose. Its strength (said loosely) serves no purpose. This is not why is is purchased. The cf hood is only there for the street car look, and imo it looks great.

Im going to hate to see this thread go 7431976928 pages lol.
 

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Im going to hate to see this thread go 7431976928 pages lol.
lol, I seriously doubt it will, and honestly, the only reason I posted this was because of daves tirade this morning. Yes, cf has its uses, and if it is a structural piece, it is a superior one.

that said, even bugatti wheels break, f1 wheels and chassis fracture, and when they do, they basically explode. even nascar is using carbon fiber hoods and panels these days, and if you watch a wreck, the cf is the first thing that starts waving like a flag in the wind.
 

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True. Too brittle to handle impact. High risk, high cost, high maintenance. High reward..
 

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Every material has it limits pending on its construction and intended use and how we actually use it, and lets not forget the process. It has its purpose only if the price tag proves it, example would be some cars limited production or not, use body is all cf and can withstand the abuse of a similar designed chassis.

I am in the same boat when it comes to cf and will only use it for looks first, the only exception would be for my bike...time for a great example...I want cf rims for my bike and most made are straight cf unless I run dymag which has a Kevlar weave included. Now all cf rims for bike leans toward steering, acceleration and handling improvements and up to closed circuit race bike power levels. I bring that in mind as high hp/tq drag bikes have broken/shattered cf rears due to the high rpm launches and sticky tarmac, built with no intent of that much "shock" and never will be.

Purchase per stress in use.
 

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This all basically covers everything.

Fiberglass heavy tool handles I find very sketchy.

I LOVE my $400 kayak paddle. Which is completely impractical for most people and honestly I dont need it. It is just pretty.
It also is RIDICULOUSLY light. Which matters.
I would get wood, like my nice canoe paddle, but wood is not near as durable. Of course...i try to baby both as both are very expensive and pretty.
 
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