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Looks like the same as the wife's versa, it's a PITA, no actual bleed screw to turn. I was half tempted to pay someone else to bleed it...

Bleeding is in the CL section of the fsm.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Looks like the same as the wife's versa, it's a PITA, no actual bleed screw to turn. I was half tempted to pay someone else to bleed it...

Bleeding is in the CL section of the fsm.
Thanks Cricki, I will check it out. The reason I asked if it would bleed by gravity is, when I pulled that line loose when I was removing the engine, it emptied the master cylinder. Thanks again, so far there doesn't seem to be much of anything easy on this build. lol
 

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Oops, got on an irritated rant there... not gravity... or at least the versa wasn't when getting all the air out and building/ holding pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cricki, being a mod myself on a DIY forum, I understand the frustrations of a subject that has been repeated many many times as is the case here. I do searches before asking questions so as not to ask the same question that has been asked before. When the answers I get aren't understandable to me is when I ask. I really do appreciate your patience, you have gone far and above helping me. In saying that, there is one question as I don't understand the instructions in the CL section of the manual.

The Manual says: Bleed the air from the clutch system according to the following: 1. Push in the lock pin (1) of the bleeding connector (2), and hold it in. CAUTION: Hold the lock pin in to prevent the bleeding connector from separating when fluid pressure is applied.

Is the lock pin pushed in from each side, or pushed down from the top? Thanks again Cricki.
 

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That is the irritating design, and if I remember correctly you push down and or slides a little bit. This could be an all day affair.
 

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Cricki, being a mod myself on a DIY forum, I understand the frustrations of a subject that has been repeated many many times as is the case here. I do searches before asking questions so as not to ask the same question that has been asked before. When the answers I get aren't understandable to me is when I ask. I really do appreciate your patience, you have gone far and above helping me. In saying that, there is one question as I don't understand the instructions in the CL section of the manual.

The Manual says: Bleed the air from the clutch system according to the following: 1. Push in the lock pin (1) of the bleeding connector (2), and hold it in. CAUTION: Hold the lock pin in to prevent the bleeding connector from separating when fluid pressure is applied.

Is the lock pin pushed in from each side, or pushed down from the top? Thanks again Cricki.
Crick is correct. Unfortunately they cannot be gravity bled. I had a shop replace my slave cylinder right after I got my car last year and I remember the mechanic telling me that he hopes to god the car burns to the ground before he ever has to bleed the clutch system again. I'm going to take that as a ''not simple, totally a Nissan thing.'' Glad to see you're getting her done man! I have been watching. I haven't had much input because my car is only a slight pile of patty instead of a complete dumpster fire (the year is new, and there's plenty of miles to change that) and I didn't have much to contribute as my engine rebuilds consist of a 4.6 2V from a Ford, a 4.3 Vortec from a S10 and a 4G64 from a Galant and I didn't want to muddy up your post with nothing that didn't contribute directly.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The more I read the more I am afraid that I am going to have to pull that engine back out. I used the old throw out bearing. The slave cylinder and throw out bearing are all one thing. I didn't think to bleed that slave cylinder inside the bell housing and there is no way under the sun to get to it other than pull the engine and drop the transmission again. I see why I got such a good deal on this car now, it is a car from...well you know. The rest of the car is perfect, it really does look like it just came off the showroom floor. Everything works, the car was well taken care of...except for the blame engine. I am making another career with this car.

Question, I know the way to bench bleed the slave cylinder that is around the pilot shaft. You put the end of the hose in fluid and pump it by hand until all the air is out. My question is: Can I pull a vacuum on the hose to pull all the air out of the slave then let fluid go back in? Would that work? I don't know how I would pull a vacuum on it but...

Another question. Since I am using the same slave that was in there and it hasn't been pumped, do you think the fluid is still in that cylinder? Do you think I need to re-bleed it?
 

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The more I read the more I am afraid that I am going to have to pull that engine back out. I used the old throw out bearing. The slave cylinder and throw out bearing are all one thing. I didn't think to bleed that slave cylinder inside the bell housing and there is no way under the sun to get to it other than pull the engine and drop the transmission again. I see why I got such a good deal on this car now, it is a car from...well you know. The rest of the car is perfect, it really does look like it just came off the showroom floor. Everything works, the car was well taken care of...except for the blame engine. I am making another career with this car.

Question, I know the way to bench bleed the slave cylinder that is around the pilot shaft. You put the end of the hose in fluid and pump it by hand until all the air is out. My question is: Can I pull a vacuum on the hose to pull all the air out of the slave then let fluid go back in? Would that work? I don't know how I would pull a vacuum on it but...

Another question. Since I am using the same slave that was in there and it hasn't been pumped, do you think the fluid is still in that cylinder? Do you think I need to re-bleed it?
I'm not sure how much use this will be for you, but here's a service manual that I was able to find for the B16 Sentra: 2007 NISSAN SENTRA Service Repair Manual
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you Alpha, I will for sure check that link out, I really do appreciate it.

Just a thought: why can't I pull the line going to the transmission from the outside of the cylinder on the firewall and using a turkey baster and bleed all the air out of that line down to the transmission. There will be fluid in that line. Leave that line open that hooks from the cylinder, at the firewall, and let all the air in the slave inside of the transmission bubble to the top of that line. It should work to get the air out of the slave that is on the pilot shaft.

Then I would have to bench bleed that cylinder on the firewall to get all the air out of it. Re-connect the lines and it should be good to go. What do you think, do you think that might work? Does anyone see a problem whit this?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Since yesterday I found out that there is a clutch damper in the line from the cylinder at the firewall to the slave around the pilot shaft. That valve is the reason it is so hard to bleed this system if I don't miss my guess.

The valve is to allow the clutch to slip a little for people who don't know how to drive a stick shift like in the old days. Sorta like a shock absorber. Back then when a person was learning to drive a stick, the car would jump and jerk because when they let out on the clutch peddle, it took off. This damper, from what I understand, stops that jerking, it allows the clutch plate to slip a little to damper the BAM when letting off the clutch fast. If I am wrong, please let me know.

Since that damper is in line with trying to bleed the system, why can't it be removed, bleed the line and put it back in if you want it in?
 
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