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Discussion Starter #1
I recently replaced a stripped wheel stud while also changing out the brake pads and rotors but found a very noticeable knocking sound to be present whenever I let off the gas. Anytime I let off the gas at any speed the knocking sound is consistently present and sounds like a machine gun in terms of the speed of the knocking sound.

When I replaced the wheel stud I hammered it in but found it was incredibly difficult to do because of the angle and the fact that I didn't have a 3 pound hammer but rather a standard hammer. Another mistake I made was not fitting the new top brake clip properly which somehow was smashed by the brake pad during my first test drive creating a very bad scraping sound which was fixed by simply replacing the clip.

I checked lug nuts which were tightened and tried to visually inspect the mechanics surrounding the wheel but couldn't visually identify anything, any idea what I should check next?
 

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I recently replaced a stripped wheel stud while also changing out the brake pads and rotors but found a very noticeable knocking sound to be present whenever I let off the gas. Anytime I let off the gas at any speed the knocking sound is consistently present and sounds like a machine gun in terms of the speed of the knocking sound.

When I replaced the wheel stud I hammered it in but found it was incredibly difficult to do because of the angle and the fact that I didn't have a 3 pound hammer but rather a standard hammer. Another mistake I made was not fitting the new top brake clip properly which somehow was smashed by the brake pad during my first test drive creating a very bad scraping sound which was fixed by simply replacing the clip.

I checked lug nuts which were tightened and tried to visually inspect the mechanics surrounding the wheel but couldn't visually identify anything, any idea what I should check next?
if I had to guess, and thats all this is, without being able to inspect, I would say you did not get the wheel stud all the way in, and the wheel bearing may have some play in it, which under braking could cause the bearing to move, and allow the stud to hit on the knuckle at some point. an inspection will tell you for sure, but you would have to remove the caliper and rotor to get a good look at it. An easy way to tell if the wheel bearing is going bad, is to raise the car, and grab the tire at the top and bottom, and try to rock it back and forth. if there is perceptible movement in the wheel, or a clicking sound, you need wheel bearings. You did not say if it was the front or rear, but the same check will work on both, only difference is, the rears you have to replace the whole hub instead of just the bearing.

another possibility is, if you hammered the stud in, you could have bent the flange on the hub, the way to check for this is to again raise the car, and spin the wheel, if it looks like it wobbles then it can be either the bearing, or a bent hub.

I press my studs in with a ball joint press, rather than hammer on them, many people pull them in with a lug nut and a few washers, but hammering it in is really not the best way to go
 

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if I had to guess, and thats all this is, without being able to inspect, I would say you did not get the wheel stud all the way in, and the wheel bearing may have some play in it, which under braking could cause the bearing to move, and allow the stud to hit on the knuckle at some point. an inspection will tell you for sure, but you would have to remove the caliper and rotor to get a good look at it. An easy way to tell if the wheel bearing is going bad, is to raise the car, and grab the tire at the top and bottom, and try to rock it back and forth. if there is perceptible movement in the wheel, or a clicking sound, you need wheel bearings. You did not say if it was the front or rear, but the same check will work on both, only difference is, the rears you have to replace the whole hub instead of just the bearing.

another possibility is, if you hammered the stud in, you could have bent the flange on the hub, the way to check for this is to again raise the car, and spin the wheel, if it looks like it wobbles then it can be either the bearing, or a bent hub.

I press my studs in with a ball joint press, rather than hammer on them, many people pull them in with a lug nut and a few washers, but hammering it in is really not the best way to go
You're right about the wheel stud which was in the front drivers side wheel, when I hammered it in I couldn't get it to go flush though it was very close, I did end up visually inspecting it when the sound first started and it appeared to have pulled itself flush by itself after I drove the car. When you say braking could cause the bearing to move I've noticed that when I brake is about the only time other than riding downhill in gear or pressing the gas that the noise stops. I will try to do another visual inspection and check for the things you mentioned.
 

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You're right about the wheel stud which was in the front drivers side wheel, when I hammered it in I couldn't get it to go flush though it was very close, I did end up visually inspecting it when the sound first started and it appeared to have pulled itself flush by itself after I drove the car. When you say braking could cause the bearing to move I've noticed that when I brake is about the only time other than riding downhill in gear or pressing the gas that the noise stops. I will try to do another visual inspection and check for the things you mentioned.
if 'it pulled itself flush after you drove the car', then you will have at least one loose lug nut, maybe more.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
if 'it pulled itself flush after you drove the car', then you will have at least one loose lug nut, maybe more.
for future reference, its NEVER a good idea to hammer on anything suspension related, either buy, or rent the appropriate tools, dont just hammer till it fits. that bends things, and can break things
I did make sure to recheck for loose lug nuts after the noise started and ruled that out, their seems to be conflicting opinions online on what the best method to install a wheel stud is, a common one seems to be to thread the stud with a lug nut or other appropriate item but some say that can damage the wheel bearings. I think I recall reading on this forum that hammering was better than using a lug nut to thread it in but that was using a 3 pound hammer which I didn't have. A ball point press seems like it would be even better.
 

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I did make sure to recheck for loose lug nuts after the noise started and ruled that out, their seems to be conflicting opinions online on what the best method to install a wheel stud is, a common one seems to be to thread the stud with a lug nut or other appropriate item but some say that can damage the wheel bearings. I think I recall reading on this forum that hammering was better than using a lug nut to thread it in but that was using a 3 pound hammer which I didn't have. A ball point press seems like it would be even better.
hammering can work, but, you need to do it with the hub separate, and supported by a socket or something to keep it from bending. the lug nut method works as well, but possibly can strip the threads. I prefer to press them in with a ball joint press, rather than hammer or pull, to avoid the issues each offers
 

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Possible your caliper is loose.
Check that if you haven't.

Probably not what it is.
Pretty much just need to check everything.
 

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Never hammer a stud through. It doesnt sit flat and wobbles in further widening the hole. A stud puller tool $10 and should be used. I had a horrible experience with washers pulling a stud through. Never again, there is a tool for that!

I feel like the problem should be obvious if you feel for it by hand. Sometimes pads can knock if the pad is slightly smaller than the bracket, but usually not it. Does it ever change while applying brakes? That should tell you where the problem is. Just gotta check your work and whatever nuts and bolts you touched.
 
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