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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
so we have our turbo in and well tuned
have learned all about heat protection, different oils for turbo engines
increased maintenance

learned to:

protect wiring
20161014_120052 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr


carry spare's and a fire extinguisher
DSCN0518 (2) by Barry Belgard, on Flickr


use 4ply couplers instead of lesser varieties
20170618_112921_1497799922763 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

use a better turbo blanket
and perhaps clock the turbo at less than ideal to save heat burned oil drain line [replaced]
DSCN0486 (2) by Barry Belgard, on Flickr





use lots of locktite everywhere
and even add some bling
DSCN0480 (3) by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

the motor's running perfect
very streetable
and can even stand 6 hours of this
[eclipse day]
20170821_180122 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr


you have come to understand the need for better brakes
20170811_130338 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr
20170811_130354 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

improved and/or reconditioned suspension
20170811_130557 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

and you can hustle the car around corners
1309396 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr


HOWever
on the straight and narrow
its a a tiny sparrow

why
it witches when it hops and to my chops, gives bops

it tramlines, tq steers,
hops and on a dragstrip brings tears

so sensitive to tires, , tread and wheels
it feels

once i was in never, never land
using ill-eagle, dangerous tires to join that band
20170811_134921 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

on the track, any track these were grand

this part is sorta a poem
cause its a dream scheme, on the street like this, you should not roam
:nono:



tq steer was minimized, and tramlining at wot
was hardly felt

all the power could be used
it was wot a lot


this left real tires, none of which were really satisfactory

worked but rubbed
CP4_1380web-(ZF-5022-41486-1-001) by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

tramlining so horrible, i had to try two sets to be sure
size comparison with previous set
DSCN0323 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

they wore very well and lasted [for me] a long time
dscn1266 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

on to even smaller tires
r-comps up front
did no better
DSCN0633 (2) by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

so next season back to DOT slicks on the right

wheels could be too wide or spaced too far out
but they are the last of the 5zigens
hesitant to let them go
20170811_141126 by Barry Belgard, on Flickr

suggestions, addendum's and your learning's after some turbo usage
welcome
 

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Always run a turbo blanket or shield or you may melt a fan and overheat


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
 
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Wondering if ceramic coats on the hot side of the turbo are effective enough... Kinda has me worried, or more questioning. But did the research and chose what I chose. Shouldnt double shield it with a blanket on top as it needs to breathe. The last big thing Im in trouble with is tires. Need a 235 with a 4 lug rim that fits.
 

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Wondering if ceramic coats on the hot side of the turbo are effective enough... Kinda has me worried, or more questioning. But did the research and chose what I chose. Shouldnt double shield it with a blanket on top as it needs to breathe. The last big thing Im in trouble with is tires. Need a 235 with a 4 lug rim that fits.
My turbo also seems to sit closer to the fans then some of the other guys do. There running treadstone manifolds I believe as to I'm running a custom manifold and dp

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Ah the Treadstone is what Ill have. Still I think I will gold foil and heat wrap a couple things close by.
 

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Ah the Treadstone is what Ill have. Still I think I will gold foil and heat wrap a couple things close by.
Ya I need to do that as well!

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks to Shanover who developed this idea
DSCN0759 (2) by Barry Belgard, on Flickr






for those people running very hot
who seek an independent fan controller

for high amp usage fans such as large spal units

a dual fan controller with 3, 30 amp relays and a 70 amp fuse block
combined with a thermostat in the upper radiator hose
may work for you as well as it does for me
DSCN0755 (2) by Barry Belgard, on Flickr
DSCN0754 (2) by Barry Belgard, on Flickr
:cool2:
 

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ingenuity!
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
next up

those involved in rollons, 1/4 mile runs, or all out track events
may notice our fuel system begins to fade ,at extreme g's and wot for more than 14-15secs

even with an upgraded pump

extreme g's to the rear or side, at low tank levels, starves the pump

a surge tank may solve this problem
and allow us to safely save some weight too
[about 18lbs, if we can cut a 1/4 tank of gas, from the runs


[note
does not really apply to turbo daily drivers.
ask yourself?
starting at highway speeds,
how often have you held it wide open for 14sec?]


even from a dead stop, wot [280whp and more] in 14 sec
you would be well into triple digit speeds
 

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I will add this here as well, at the request of @yogi b.

With the higher combustion pressures, comes increased blow by. Our PCV system really is not set up for a boosted application, we know this so we run catch cans and drill out the pcv and valve cover vent to help, but there is another area that almost always has issues, and that is the valve cover to spark plug tube seals.

Spend a lot of time in boost, and they begin to leak into the plug wells.

Only solution to this point, has been to replace the valve cover with a new one.

We know the actual Nissan valve covers are expensive, well over $120 from most places, and aftermarket just doesnt seem to do the job as well, I tried one and didnt even boost and the plug wells were full of oil.

Bought a brand new nissan valve cover, played in boost for a week, and #1 and #2 were full of oil.

This really is not acceptable, and there is no simple way of just replacing the seals themselves.

The valve cover seals are designed, to vent excess pressure in the block, is my assumption. they are installed backwards (upside down) in the valve cover, with the lip of the seal pointing up, or, in other words, there is no way it will seal with any pressure on the crank case.

IF we could replace the seals, and install them in the correct orientation, they would be more difficult to install, but would in my mind, NEVER leak.

My solution, and it has been working well for over a year now:

I use a syringe with a piece of tubing on it to suck the oil out of the plug wells before I remove the plug, this will keep MOST of the oil out of the cylinders.

Remove the valve cover, and prep the head surface as if you were just replacing the valve cover, removing all old RTV sealant from the head, and applying new to the corners by the front cam cap.

Just before you set the valve cover, apply a very thin smear of RTV around the outside of the top of the plug wells, do not clean the plug wells, or the seals in the valve cover. This smear of RTV should be very thin, almost see thru, dont glop it on.

Once the RTV is applied, set the valve cover quickly before the RTV cures.

as with any other repair involving RTV, let it sit and cure for a while before you start the car.

As I said, I have not had a plug seal leak since I started doing this, and have had the valve cover off many times, and by not cleaning the seals or plug wells before you apply the RTV, the valve cover will come off easily the next time you remove it. you will also see, on the plug wells, where the seals pushed the RTV down, and formed a small lip on the plug well.

Yogi is planning on doing this, and taking pictures during the process to better illustrate what the process is. I can add them here at a later date, when he has done his repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks shanover the valve cover mod seems vital to turbo builds
both drilling it out and doing something to prolong spark plug seal life


looks like i'm starting on this tomorrow if the parts arrive
so pics will be up soon

Just before you set the valve cover, apply a very thin smear of RTV around the outside of the top of the plug wells, do not clean the plug wells, or the seals in the valve cover.

to clarify a thin smear of rtv is applied around the inside of the seal where it contacts the plug
or at the edges where the seal contacts the valve cover?
 

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Thanks shanover the valve cover mod seems vital to turbo builds
both drilling it out and doing something to prolong spark plug seal life


looks like i'm starting on this tomorrow if the parts arrive
so pics will be up soon

Just before you set the valve cover, apply a very thin smear of RTV around the outside of the top of the plug wells, do not clean the plug wells, or the seals in the valve cover.

to clarify a thin smear of rtv is applied around the inside of the seal where it contacts the plug
or at the edges where the seal contacts the valve cover?
outside of the plug tube wells, as indicated by the orange areas
F144676828.jpg
 

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I'll post this up since my significant anchor is at her sisters tonight and I dont have anyone to entertain me...

15 Things I learned once I decided to go boost

1. Its going to cost much more than you anticipated, unless you piece everything together and can tune on your own.
2. Make sure you can STOP just as fast as you can accelerate!!! VERY IMPORTANT!!
3. Parts wear out, they wear out exponentially faster once you increase the horsepower significantly above stock
4. Make sure, when you do your build, you take care of all the extras! Get that Koyo Radiator, Get that new set of cam and crank sensors, Get that stock, or if you can find one, ATI damper! Light weight dampers are hard on oil pumps and cranks!
5. Couplers will end up being an issue, get used to it, this motor was never meant to be boosted, it takes more care than a stock motor
6. Maintenance will increase exponentially as well. Your new boosted engine that gives you that tickle in the pants, needs more care, more checking of bolts, more frequent oil changes, more frequent 'going over' than stock ever will
7. If your engine builder recommends something, find a way to pay! my sleeved block ended up costing me over $6K when it had to be redone because I didnt think the stock block would ever need sleeves at 360 hp
8. Fuel use WILL go up, while you can get an 'econo tune', once you have the high boost map in your mind, you will never go back there.
9. Expect the random, totally out of the blue issue, it WILL happen, usually at the worst time possible
10 Once its running and you have a taste for it, boost is addictive,you HAVE to have it when you drive. I had a coupler blow off on the way to work the other day, spent the whole day as a 'higher compression (10.5-1) NA engine..' its not the same, you dont get that 'RUSH' that you will with a boosted engine when you accelerate, either on the on ramp, or racing against someone.
11. Spend the money and get a really good (heated!) catch can, it can make the difference between cleaning the MAF and catch can weekly, and driving with no problems for several months.
12. Tires, Make sure your tires are up to the task, anything over about 350HP will tax the fook out of your all seasons, and MOST main stream summer tires, Suddenly, your sumitomos and firestone wide ovals will be useless in the first three gears, and the top of fourth
13. Make sure your suspension is up to the added power, Nothing can ruin your day like your discount struts, springs, and swaybar cheap kit can. buy the stuff thats proven, not the stuff that you find on ebay.
14. Only use OEM (Nissan) sensors, and coil packs. the added load of a boosted engine means that any shortfall will be exponentially greater.
15. Cam and crank sensors go out MORE often, as does the cam chain tensioner.

I have been running in boost for close to 50K miles now, as a daily driver, I dont hit boost every day, and sometimes not even every week, but its nice to know its there, and if I wanted to, I could hit 15psi boost within seconds of nailing the throttle, tires, brakes, and paying attention are keys here. Dont go fast if you cannot stop, dont assume that just because when you were NA you only had to check the oil when you got it changed. The whole motor will be a different animal than you are used to, and as such, requires different care. Plan accordingly, you know your oil needs to be changed every 3K miles, have it ready long before then so you can change it. Coil packs will be an issue, plan for it and get a spare or two. Crank and cam sensor will be an issue, plan for it and have spares on hand. The higher HP builds seem to eat cam chain tensioners as well, wouldnt be a bad idea to have a spare laying around, or have access to one within days.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
i support this
while my car uses are very different than shanovers
our experiences are quite similar

my car is far from a daily driver,
although i have been turbo'd for 3 years, i only have 10,000 miles on this motor

track cars, frequent drag racers and other motorsport usage is hard on cars
increased maintenance is expected

however, it was3x the cost of running the vq the same way
for example in the same time frame [1 race season]

both used 1 alternator
oil changed pre and post event
and about 300 dollars worth of race gas
then


turbo then vq
5-6sets of plugs turbo vs 2 sets vq
4 sets of c and c twins vs 1set

1throttle body vs none ever
3mafs to 3 mafs but the vq used 02 terrible mafs
2sets of super pro bushing plus the lca vs 1 set of bushings

3 valve covers vs none
8 coils vs 1 coil

5 dyno tunes vs ecu reflash [once ever]
3 camchain tensioners vs none
2 cam chains vs none
1 cylinder head vs none

constant coupler problems and maintenance vs none
3 fan setups all the way to spals till success vs one set cheapie jegs fans

burnt out fan controler vs ecu controlled fans

emphasis mine in bold below
I'll post this up since my significant anchor is at her sisters tonight and I dont have anyone to entertain me...

15 Things I learned once I decided to go boost

1. Its going to cost much more than you anticipated, unless you piece everything together and can tune on your own.
2. Make sure you can STOP just as fast as you can accelerate!!! VERY IMPORTANT!!
3. Parts wear out, they wear out exponentially faster once you increase the horsepower significantly above stock
4. Make sure, when you do your build, you take care of all the extras! Get that Koyo Radiator, Get that new set of cam and crank sensors, Get that stock, or if you can find one, ATI damper! Light weight dampers are hard on oil pumps and cranks!
5. Couplers will end up being an issue, get used to it, this motor was never meant to be boosted, it takes more care than a stock motor
6. Maintenance will increase exponentially as well. Your new boosted engine that gives you that tickle in the pants, needs more care, more checking of bolts, more frequent oil changes, more frequent 'going over' than stock ever will
build for the power you expect to make plus 50%7. If your engine builder recommends something, find a way to pay! my sleeved block ended up costing me over $6K when it had to be redone because I didnt think the stock block would ever need sleeves at 360 hp
8. Fuel use WILL go up, while you can get an 'econo tune', once you have the high boost map in your mind, you will never go back there.
9. Expect the random, totally out of the blue issue, it WILL happen, usually at the worst time possible
10 Once its running and you have a taste for it, power/boost is addictive,you HAVE to have it when you drive. I had a coupler blow off on the way to work the other day, spent the whole day as a 'higher compression (10.5-1) NA engine..' its not the same, you dont get that 'RUSH' that you will with a boosted engine when you accelerate, either on the on ramp, or racing against someone.
11. Spend the money and get a really good (heated!) catch can, it can make the difference between cleaning the MAF and catch can weekly, and driving with no problems for several months.
12. Tires, Make sure your tires are up to the task, anything over about 350HP will tax the fook out of your all seasons, and MOST main stream summer tires, Suddenly, your sumitomos and firestone wide ovals will be useless in the first three gears, and the top of fourth
13. Make sure your suspension is up to the added power, Nothing can ruin your day like your discount struts, springs, and swaybar cheap kit can. buy the stuff thats proven, not the stuff that you find on ebay.
14. Only use OEM (Nissan) sensors, and coil packs. the added load of a boosted engine means that any shortfall will be exponentially greater.
15. Cam and crank sensors go out MORE often, as does the cam chain tensioner.

I have been running in boost for close to 50K miles now, as a daily driver,here is our difference in use. on track or strip, mostly in boost, every time it's used I dont hit boost every day, and sometimes not even every week, but its nice to know its there, and if I wanted to, I could hit 15psi boost within seconds of nailing the throttle, tires, brakes, and paying attention are keys here. Dont go fast if you cannot stop, dont assume that just because when you were NA you only had to check the oil when you got it changed. The whole motor will be a different animal than you are used to, and as such, requires different care. Plan accordingly, you know your oil needs to be changed every 3K miles, have it ready long before then so you can change it. Coil packs will be an issue, plan for it and get a spare or two. Crank and cam sensor will be an issue, plan for it and have spares on hand. The higher HP builds seem to eat cam chain tensioners as well, wouldnt be a bad idea to have a spare laying around, or have access to one within days.
what i find alarming
is that our very different usage produces very similar results
qr25de engines at or above 350 whp are high maintenance items
 

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what i find alarming
is that our very different usage produces very similar results
qr25de engines at or above 350 whp are high maintenance items
Since having to get the sleeved block, I have become very anal about checking things, and making sure everything is right. I normally check plugs weekly, and oil at a minimum of every other day. make sure the turbo bolts are still snug about every month, I have been starting to stretch things out as I learn how long I can go, for example I change my oil every 3000 miles or slightly before, USUALLY I will lose about 1/4" on the dipstick at the most, but thats one of the things I check all the time, plugs can go longer, probably every two weeks, as I have never really found a problem with them, but they do get changed several times a year. I have never had an appreciable amount of oil in my catch can since I went with the heated one, just a few drops here and there. I check coolant level the same time I check my oil, and other than the typical evaporative loss from silicone hoses, it has never been low. I still check tho, this thing has cost too much to take anything for granted.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
let us begin the valve cover mod procedure

1st we must be able to remove and replace it
here is a vid i found of great use
note valve cover removal requires a different bolt sequence than tightening those same bolts
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qvqh3DQgsBo

btw
the 2step tightening process in ftlbs
1st step=2 flbs
2nd step=6 ftlbs

once off we are going to enlarge all the holes in the new one

then add a small smidge around the plug tubes
use the best quality grey rtv you can afford

pics coming
my vc is not here yet
 

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let us begin the valve cover mod procedure

1st we must be able to remove and replace it
here is a vid i found of great use
note valve cover removal requires a different bolt sequence than tightening those same bolts
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qvqh3DQgsBo

btw
the 2step tightening process in ftlbs
1st step=2 flbs
2nd step=6 ftlbs

once off we are going to enlarge all the holes in the new one

then add a small smidge around the plug tubes
use the best quality grey rtv you can afford

pics coming
my vc is not here yet
for those of us who do not have a Ft/Lb torque wrench that will go that low, but do have an inch pound torque wrench, the conversion is:
24 inch pounds
72 inch pounds.

lowest my foot pound torque wrench will read is 50 foot pounds.
 
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